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Posts Tagged ‘Data’

Due to the advertising overload that is Valentine’s day, most men (including the writers of this fine blog) spend the day thinking about woman/women (depending on marital status).

Under the circumstances, I thought this was the right time to advertise the ‘flaw of averages.’ It’s a really simple idea, but one that needs to be taught in every business school. Very simply, if you’re planning for some uncertain eventuality- the plan that works well against the average eventuality probably doesn’t work very well on average.

So, in particular gentlemen, please don’t plan to snag these women:

It probably won’t work out well on average…

HT: the Face of Tomorrow via the now annoyingly redone Gawker site that is Gizmodo.

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Before we start, yes I am aware that the title of this post both irrevocably dates me and might well be construed as a telling commentary on my taste in cinema. Fair warning is given to any readers who intend to visit regularly that the B-movie references are probably just going uphill from here.

Moving smoothly on from there however, I recently came across a fascinating bit of data visualization that I assure you will be a pleasant diversion from the more productive tasks you are no doubt busily occupied with.

All of us at here at A Spoonful of Win have discussed how Facebook – the One Page That Binds Us All – is constantly toying with privacy settings. In the cat and mouse game that is our attempt to control social image, Facebook wields the powerful tool known as “Default Settings” with implacable authority. In doing so the social network taps into a hypocrisy at the very core of our being, a sort of unmentionable desire to spy unseen. We want to know about everything and everyone and we want to do so in relative anonymity. Networks can be set up to make one of these tasks easy, but not both, and the 500 million users of Facebook are a powerful endorsement of design choices.

Matt McKeon graphs the evolution of privacy settings on Facebook, year by year, a story in pictures that is most certainly worth a few hundred words. Check it out.

Copyright Matt McKeon

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